Shockwave Therapy for Dupuytren’s disease

Shockwave Therapy for Dupuytren’s disease Shockwave Therapy for Dupuytren’s disease which is a condition in which one or more fingers become permanently bent in a flexed position. It usually begins as small hard nodules just under the skin of the palm. This affliction is sometimes  referred to as Viking disease due to its high incidence among people of Scandinavian and North European descent. Given the fact that recurrence rate in Dupuytren’s disease is high and unpredictable extracorporeal shockwave therapy as a non-invasive tool might be applicable both, in the primary and secondary prevention of the progression as well as for treatment. The cause is unknown and sufferers usually start showing symptoms at age 40 with men acquiring the disease more often than women; it often runs in families. There is a slow progression with the affliction that almost always affects the ring finger as well as the little and middle fingers. Firm nodules appear in the ligaments just beneath the skin of the palm of the hand, and in some cases they extend to form cords that can prevent the finger straightening completely. The nodules and cords may be associated with small pits in the skin. Without treatment, one or more fingers may become fixed in a bent position. The web between thumb and index finger is sometimes narrowed. Contracture of fingers is usually slow, occurring over months and years rather than weeks. Dupuytren’s disease may be associated with diabetes, smoking and high alcohol consumption, but many affected people have none of these. It does not appear to be associated with manual work. It occasionally appears after injury to the...
RUN: Better, Faster, Longer, Stronger

RUN: Better, Faster, Longer, Stronger

RUN: Better, Faster, Longer, Stronger Do you dream of being that runner where every step of every mile is 100% pain free? No aches, no twinges or niggles, no lingering soreness from yesterday’s session. Well, you are not alone; research shows that as many as 79% of runners get injured at least once during the year. Stop. Think about that number for a moment; nearly 8 out of every 10 runners you see at your next race have been or will be injured sometime that year. Think of running pains in terms of a spectrum. At one end you have severe, full-blown injuries, we’ll name that the red zone, which includes stress fractures that require time off. The other end, where you’re in top form, is the green zone. Mild, transient aches that bug you one day and disappear the next sit closer to the green end. Unfortunately, many runners get stuck in the middle, in the not-quite-injured but not-quite-healthy yellow zone. Your ability to stay in the green zone depends largely on how you react to that first stab of pain. Often a little rest now, or reduction in training mileage and intensity, with some treatment, can prevent a lot of time off later. Developing a proactive long-term injury-prevention strategy, such as strength training, stretching, regular massage and foam-rolling can help keep you in the ‘green.’ Physical therapy is a lot like homework, not all of us like having to do it, but if you don’t do it, you’re sure to get in trouble at some stage! You can find more information and exercise leaflets for injury prevention...

Battlefield Acupuncture

Battlefield acupuncture to treat low back pain in the emergency department Battlefield acupuncture to treat low back pain in the emergency department – Battlefield acupuncture (BFA) is an ear acupuncture protocol used by the military for immediate pain relief. This is a pilot feasibility study of BFA as a treatment for acute low back pain (LBP) in an accident and emergency department (ED). Click here to continue reading. Battlefield Acupuncture Protocol Information Description The Battlefield Acupuncture protocol was developed by Col. Richard C. Niemtzow, MD, PhD, MPH. It is designed to be administered quickly and easily in a variety of situations and delivers rapid pain relief. Results are often significant and long-lasting. Treatment is performed according to the following protocol: Treatment order is Cingulate Gyrus, Thalamus Point, Omega 2, Point Zero, Shen Men. Choose an ear (it doesn’t matter which ear) and insert a needle in Cingulate Gyrus point. Ask the patient to walk or move the painful part for 30 seconds. If there is no significant pain relief (at least 20%) move on to step 3. Insert a needle in Cingulate Gyrus point on the opposite ear from step 2. Ask the patient to walk or move the painful part for 30 seconds. If there is no significant pain relief (at least 20%) move on to step 4. Insert a needle in Thalamus point on the same ear as step 2. Ask the patient to walk or move the painful part for 30 seconds. If there is no significant pain relief (at least 20%) continue with Thalamus point in the opposite ear. Continue as above, in the correct...

Shockwave Therapy for Trochenteric bursitis

Shockwave Therapy for Trochanteric bursitis- what is it? Shockwave therapy can be used to treat Trochanteric bursitis.  Trochanteric bursitis is an awful pain in the hip… it is inflammation of the bursa on the side of the hip. Bursae are fluid filled sacks that lie over bony prominences and allow muscles and tendons to move freely. This may also affect the tendons to the hip muscles. This is called Calcific tendonopathy. Trochanteric Bursitis and Calcific tendonopathy is a common cause of hip pain. What are the symptoms? • Pain on outside of the hip or thigh. • Often worse when walking and can cause limping. • Can disturb sleep especially if lying on affected side. • Swelling is sometimes observed on the side of the hip what are the causes? • Unequal leg length. • Altered biomechanics. • Repetitive activities. • Weak hip muscles. What’s the treatment? WATCH THE VIDEO Treatment of trochanteric bursitis (greater trochanteric pain syndrome [GTPS]) may include: relative rest, application of ice, injection of corticosteroids and local anesthetics, administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). So, what if you’ve done all of the treatment and you still have the pain!? The answer may lie with Extracorporeal Shockwave therapy (ESWT). Here at Therapy in Motion we use the Zimmer en puls Shockwave therapy machine manufactured in Germany. ESWT is a procedure where shock waves are passed through the skin to the injured part of the body, using a special device. Extracorporeal means outside of the body. The shockwaves are mechanical and not electric. They are audible, low-energy sound waves, which work by increasing blood flow to the injured...